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Relating PPI to my work area

The following section highlights how PPI may operate within particular HSC work areas. PPI applies to all HSC staff regardless of job role or function.

I am a finance manager, how is PPI relevant to me?
As a finance manager you may not be in regular contact with patients, service users, carers or the wider public; however your work will ultimately impact on all of these. For example, you may manage a direct payments programme, be involved in commissioning or managing contracts for service delivery.

Involving people in the right way at the right time is very beneficial for a variety of reasons: sharing information about your systems and procedures to ensure transparency, providing opportunities for service users and carers to work with you to change systems, or attending working groups with community representatives to review contracting procedures.

I am a nurse in a hospital ward, how is PPI relevant to me?
As a nurse, you already have lots of informal interaction with patients, their families and carers.

Personal and Public Involvement (PPI) seeks to make that interaction more consistent, so that it becomes an integral part of your job. It will challenge you to move those interactions on from, for example, sharing information about a treatment path with a patient, to a planned approach of actively involving them and their family in deciding a treatment path (where appropriate and safe to do so).

PPI means enabling patients, service users and carers to be equal partners in these decisions. It means respecting their expertise by experience and working to tailor service to identified need, to ensure that they are truly person centred. It also challenges you to think beyond the hospital world, to the wider public, and meaningful ways to involve them in deciding on new services or practices by developing forums or liaison groups.

It isn’t about talking to all of the people all of the time, but it is about involving people at the right time and in the right way.

I am a hospital Consultant, how is PPI relevant to me?
As a hospital consultant you hold a very responsible and complex post within Health and Social Care (HSC), including making decisions about patient care and treatments, management, teaching and training.

You will have regular conversations with patients, their families and carers in hospital settings about their conditions and treatment pathways, usually on a one-to-one basis. PPI seeks to build on these interactions to challenge you to move those interactions on from, for example, sharing information about a treatment path with a patient, to a planned approach of actively involving them and their family in deciding a treatment path (where appropriate and safe to do so).

Personal and Public Involvement (PPI) means enabling patients, service users and carers to be equal partners in these decisions. It means respecting their expertise by experience and working to tailor service to identified need, to ensure that they are truly person centred. It also challenges you to think beyond the hospital world, to the wider public, and meaningful ways to involve them in deciding on new services or practices by developing forums or liaison groups.

It isn’t about talking to all of the people all of the time, but it is about involving people at the right time and in the right way.

I am a social worker, how is PPI relevant to me?
As a social worker, Personal and Public Involvement (PPI) already forms the basis of a lot of your interactions with people, patients, family members and carers. You will be experienced in involving them in sharing information and decision making, as well as gaining valuable feedback from them about their experiences. You understand that their everyday experiences as service users and carers give them the knowledge and the expertise to say what would improve the quality of their lives and what they want from social care.

Good quality PPI in social work will challenge you to move your interactions on from an individual to a wider community context where you extend your networks and opportunities to influence and be influenced.

I am involved in local commissioning, how is PPI relevant to me?
Local commissioning groups are responsible for the commissioning of health and social care by addressing the care needs of their local population. As someone involved in local commissioning you have responsibility for assessing health and social care needs; planning health and social care to meet current and emerging needs; and securing the delivery of health and social care to meet assessed needs. This can only be done effectively by working in partnership with patients, carers, families and communities.

As well as sharing information about what local commissioning means, you must create opportunities for patients, carers, families and communities to influence, shape, co-design and evaluate services and programmes.

Service users, carers and the public should be meaningfully engaged and informed of outcomes, enabling people to understand what information was factored into your deliberations and the rationale for your final decision. Such an open/transparent approach can help ensure commissioned services are tailored to need, are more efficient, promote the concept of buy in/ownership, and improve quality, safety and levels of satisfaction with service.

I am an Allied Health Professional (AHP), how is PPI relevant to me?
Personal and Public Involvement (PPI) will already form the basis of a lot of your interactions with people, patients, family members and carers. You will be experienced in involving them in sharing information and decision making, as well as gaining valuable feedback from them about their experiences. You understand that their everyday experiences as service users and carers give them the knowledge and the expertise to say and involve them to improve the quality of their lives and what they want from the AHP service.
I am a Service Improvement Manager, how is PPI relevant to me?
As a Service Improvement Manager, Personal and Public Involvement (PPI) will be a central component of your work. When considering any service change, redevelopment or evaluation, the involvement of service users, carers and the public should be considered at the outset in relation to how they will be involved. By involving people from the start, they will be empowered to contribute to the discussions to develop options rather than just commenting on options which have been developed by staff working in Health and Social Care. This can be done effectively by developing an Involvement Plan at the start of this work to clearly identify who will be impacted by the programme of work and how and when they will be involved in the process.

Service users, carers and the public should be meaningfully engaged and informed of outcomes, enabling people to understand what information was factored into your deliberations and the rationale for your final decision. Such an open/transparent approach can help ensure services are tailored to need, are more efficient, promote the concept of buy in/ownership, and improve quality, safety and levels of satisfaction with service.

I am involved in Quality Improvement, how is PPI relevant to me?
Involving service users and carers is a key principle of Quality Improvement work.  Check out the GREAT checklist which will help you to get started to involve service users and carers as part of your work.