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Standards, policy and the law

Standards

A set of five Standards outlines what is expected from Health and Social Care (HSC) organisations and staff in relation to personal and public involvement, and were developed in partnership with service users, carers and the community and voluntary sector. They were formally endorsed by the Department of Health in 2015. Click on each Standard to find out more information.

Setting the standards

Standard One - Leadership
Health and Social Care (HSC) organisations will have in place clear leadership arrangements to provide assurances that PPI is embedded into policy and practice.
Standard Two - Governance
HSC organisations will have in place clear corporate governance arrangements to provide assurances that PPI is embedded into policy and practice.
Standard Three - Opportunities and support for involvement
HSC organisations will provide clear and accessible opportunities for involvement at all levels, facilitating and supporting the involvement of service users, carers and the public in the planning, delivery and evaluation of services.
Standard Four - Knowledge and skills
HSC organisations will provide PPI awareness-raising and training opportunities as appropriate to need, to enable all staff to deliver on their statutory PPI obligations.
Standard Five - Measuring outcomes
HSC organisations will measure the impact and evaluate outcome of PPI activity.

Policy

PPI was first introduced as a concept by the Department of Health in 2007. The Department has issued the following guidance to support the implementation:

HSC (SQSD) 29-07 – Guidance on Strengthening Personal and Public Involvement in Health and Social Care

HSC (SQSD) 01-12 – Personal and Public Involvement – Regional Protocol on Exceptional Circumstances for Consultation Schemes

HSC (SQSD) 03-12 – Guidance for HSC Organisations on Arrangements for Implementing effective Personal and Public Involvement Policy in the HSC

What the law says

HSC organisations have a legal duty to involve and consult with service users, carers and the public in relation to:

  • the planning of the provision of care;
  • the development and consideration of proposals for changes in the way that care is provided;
  • decisions that affect the provision of care.


Involvement in Health and Social Care is gaining momentum. Check out the relevant reports below, which highlight the necessity of involving service users, carers and the public.